Before You Call

Before You Call

Before you contact the office or doctor on call, the following information should be ready:

  • Are you certain your pharmacist is on duty?  Please be sure before calling us.
    baby_checkup
  • Patient allergies
  • Patient weight
  • Names and doses of current medications, and names of any antibiotics recently used.
  • Disable any telephone privacy management settings so we can get through.
  • If an adult is ill, let that person talk to the doctor if at all possible, as he or she is best able to answer questions.  If it is an infant, be ready to place the child down. Crying into the phone makes conversation difficult and hard for you to remember the advice given.
  • Have a pencil and paper available to write down the directions given.

 

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin) Dosing

 

The tables below provide recommended dosage charts for acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen (Motrin/Advil). Here are some important general guidelines for using these products:

  • We recommend acetaminophen/Tylenol for low grade fevers and mild pain. We recommend ibuprofen/Motrin/Advil for higher temperatures, more severe pain, inflammation or for when acetaminophen is not effective or you need 6 hours of relief vs. 4 hours.
  • You are treating your child, not a number on the thermometer. Your goal in treating a fever is to make your child comfortable, not to make the number lower.
  • Whenever possible, use your child’s most current weight when choosing an appropriate dose of medication.
  • Ibuprofen should be effective when acetaminophen is not. Both drugs can be given concurrently (acetaminophen every 4 hours and ibuprofen every 6 hours) if ibuprofen is ineffective alone.
  • Temperature should be measured rectally in children under 12 months; ear (otic) thermometers should be reserved for children over the age of 12 months. An oral thermometer is not appropriate until your child can hold it under his tongue for several minutes without biting (usually around age 5).
  • Never give acetaminophen or ibuprofen to an infant under 2 months of age. In addition, do not give ibuprofen to an infant under the age of 6 months without specific direction from a physician.
  • Acetaminophen rectal suppositories can be purchased at your pharmacy without a prescription. Feverall is a brand that is readily available. They are helpful to have on hand in case your child has fever or pain and is vomiting and can’t keep down acetaminophen by mouth. Use K-Y Jelly or Vaseline to lubricate the suppository and insert in the child’s rectum every 4 hours as necessary.

 

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Dosage Chart (every 4 hours, as needed)
WEIGHT AGE INFANT DROPS
(80 mg/0.8 ml)
CHILDREN’S
SUSPENSION/
ELIXIR
(160 mg/5 ml)
CHILDREN’S
SOFT CHEW
TABLETS
(80 mg each)
JR.STRENGTH
TABS/CAPS
(160 mg each)
RECTAL
SUPPOSITORIES
(various doses)
6-11 lbs 2-3 mos. 0.4 ml = ½ dropper (½) 80 mg suppository
12-17 lbs 4-11 mos. 0.8 ml = 1 dropper ½ tsp = 2.5 ml (1) 80 mg suppository
18-23 lbs 12-23 mos. 1.2 ml = 1½ dropper ¾ tsp = 3.75 ml (1) 120 mg suppository
24-35 lbs 2-3 yrs. 1.6 ml = 2 droppers 1 tsp = 5 ml 2 chew tabs (½) 325 mg suppository
36-47 lbs 4-5 yrs. 1½ tsp = 7.5 ml 3 chew tabs 1½ tabs/caps (2) 120 mg suppositories
48-59 lbs 6-8 yrs. 2 tsp = 10 ml 4 chew tabs 2 tabs/caps (1) 325 mg suppository
60-71 lbs 9-10 yrs. 2½ tsp = 12.5 ml 5 chew tabs 2½ tabs/caps (1) 325 mg suppository
72-95 lbs 11 yrs. 3 tsp = 15 ml 6 chew tabs 3 tabs/caps (1½) 325 mg suppository
over 95 lbs over 11 yrs. 4 tabs/caps OR
2 adult tabs/caps
(1) 650 mg suppository OR
(2) 325 mg suppositories

 

Ibuprofen (Motrin/Advil) Dosage Chart (every 6-8 hours, as needed)
WEIGHT AGE INFANT DROPS
(50 mg/1.25 ml)
CHILDREN’S SUSPENSION
(100 mg/5 ml)
CHEWABLE TABS
(100 mg each)
if fever < 102.5 if fever > 102.5
or pain relief
if fever < 102.5 if fever > 102.5
or pain relief
if fever < 102.5 if fever > 102.5
or pain relief
under 12 lbs 0-6 mos. Do not give ibuprofen to an infant under the age of 6 months without specific direction from a physician.
12-17 lbs 6-11 mos. 25 mg = 0.675 ml 50 mg = 1.25 ml ¼ tsp = 1.25 ml/25 mg ½ tsp = 2.5 ml/50 mg
18-23 lbs 12-23 mos. 50 mg = 1.25 ml 100 mg = 2.5 ml ½ tsp = 2.5 ml/50 mg 1 tsp = 5 ml/100 mg ½ tab = 50 mg 1 tab = 100 mg
24-35 lbs 2-3 yrs. 75 mg = 1.875 ml 150 mg = 3.75 ml ¾ tsp = 3.75 ml/75 mg 1½ tsp = 7.5 ml/150 mg ¾ tab = 75 mg 1½ tab = 150 mg
36-47 lbs 4-5 yrs. 1 tsp = 5 ml/100 mg 2 tsp = 10 ml/200 mg 1 tab = 100 mg 2 tabs = 200 mg
48-59 lbs 6-8 yrs. 1¼ tsp = 6.25 ml/125 mg 2½ tsp = 12.5 ml/250 mg 1¼ tab = 125 mg 2½ tabs = 250 mg
60-71 lbs 9-10 yrs. 1½ tsp = 7.5 ml/150 mg 3 tsp = 15 ml/300 mg 1½ tab = 150 mg 3 tabs = 300 mg
72-95 lbs 11 yrs. 2 tsp = 10 ml/200 mg
OR 1 adult cap/tab
4 tsp = 20 ml/400 mg
OR 2 adult cap/tab
2 tabs = 200 mg
OR 1 adult cap/tab
4 tabs = 400 mg
OR 2 adult cap/tab
over 95 lbs over 11 yrs. For older children who can swallow pills, adult ibuprofen contains 200 mg per capsule/tablet. Children 12 years and older can take 2 adult caps/tabs every 6-8 hours as needed, regardless of the reason for the medicine (fever, pain, headache, etc.).
Ibuprofen doses are calculated according to the reason for the medicine, including height of fever (rectal/ear) and treatment of pain. If you are taking your child’s temperature orally, add one degree to the actual reading to determine the number you should use above. Do not give ibuprofen to a child with chickenpox.